the met — marble statue of an old woman

05.10.2016

  

The Marble Statue of an Old Woman seen at the Met was the sculpture that caught my attention the most. Though I did not find it the most “beautiful,” I found the idea of it to be interesting. While all of the marble sculptures were of young immortal godly figures finished with a predominantly smooth surface of contrapposto, the Marble Statue of an Old Woman showed texture within the wrinkly skin and rugged clothing while standing in a decrepit hovering posture. The Marble Statue of an Old Woman created a mortal piece that is seemingly about to deteriorate. Creating a sculpture of a mortal was unthinkable. The point of sculptures was to glorify the immortality of the perfect Gods. The revolutionary thought of commemorating an old common woman in a marketplace was an inspiration for artists to be more authentic and honest with their work. Adding the subtle blemishes contributed personality and character to their art pieces. Those are the imperfections that makes each person unique, and with uniqueness, artist were able to craft and mold a wide variety of emotions, postures, props, and clothing within a sculpture.

 

This authenticity was celebrated during the Hellenistic period where sculptures humanized the Gods and captured

accurate depictions of everyday people or superhumans. The honest message of realism and mortality delivered from the Marble Statue of an Old Woman was the end of the first cycle. Moving along from the erect utilitarian posture with cold emotionless expressions to animated facial expressions, bent hips, and hand gestures, the new form of undeceiving art was the turning page to a new era of a different styles and experimentations to capture and record reality.

 

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06.20.2018

06.20.2018

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